It Must Be So

Lord Byron (1788 – 1824)

A Riddle on the Letter E

The beginning of eternity, the end of time and space,
The beginning of every end, and the end of every place.

Lord Byron

 

If That High World

by Lord Byron

If that high world, which lies beyond
Our own, surviving Love endears;
If there the cherish’d heart be fond,
The eye the same, except in tears –
How welcome those untrodden spheres!
How sweet this very hour to die!
To soar from earth and find all fears
Lost in thy light – Eternity!
It must be so: ’tis not for self
That we so tremble on the brink;
And striving to o’erleap the gulf,
Yet cling to Being’s severing link.
Oh! in that future let us think
To hold each heart the heart that shares;
With them the immortal waters drink,
And soul in soul grow deathless theirs!


On Parting

by Lord Byron

The kiss, dear maid! thy lip has left
Shall never part from mine,
Till happier hours restore the gift
Untainted back to thine.
Thy parting glance, which fondly beams,
An equal love may see:
The tear that from thing eyelid streams
Can weep no change in me.
I ask no pledge to make me blest
In gazing when alone;
Nor one memorial for a breast,
Whose thoughts are all thine own.
Nor need I write to tell the tale
My pen were doubly weak:
Oh! what can idle words avail,
Unless the heart could speak?
By day or night, in weal or woe,
That heart, no longer free,
Must bear the love it cannot show,
And silent ache for thee.

Weep For The Legendary Dragon

 

The American poet Sylvia Plath (1932-1963) in 1961. New York Public LIbrary Picture Collection.
Sylvia Plath (1932 – 1963)

“The great art of life is sensation – to feel that we exist, even though in pain.”

Lord Byron (1788 – 1824)

CXXXIV

By Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)

So now I have confessed that he is thine,
And I my self am mortgaged to thy will,
Myself I’ll forfeit, so that other mine
Thou wilt restore to be my comfort still:
But thou wilt not, nor he will not be free,
For thou art covetous, and he is kind;
He learned but surety-like to write for me,
Under that bond that him as fast doth bind.
The statute of thy beauty thou wilt take,
Thou usurer, that put’st forth all to use,
And sue a friend came debtor for my sake;
So him I lose through my unkind abuse.
Him have I lost; thou hast both him and me:
He pays the whole, and yet am I not free.

 

I am conflicted by the idea that art can only come from a well-spring of great experience, be it love or tragedy in spades.  I think sometimes art can come equally from the mundacity of life as well.  However, I recognize that artists have their own favorites when it comes to their creations. I feel more strongly about some of my poems than others, and specific poems stand out in my mind because they become in my memory like a snapshot of a key event.  It would be an interesting thing to discuss with artists, what shaped the creation of your favorite piece of art and to see whether there is a common thread of experience?

There is no denying that a certain amount of ego and impulsiveness is required to be an artist.  The creative process, if it is to be shared with others, requires at some point that an artist must get naked in public metaphorically speaking.  The quesiton each artist must answer is how much skin to bare and when does the process of creating art jump the barrier from tasteful nude to pornography because of the severity of what is depicted?

It is an interesting question, the idea that art can be pornographic in a graphic sense of how much our interior is revealed.  The list of artists who were (are) tortured souls is nearly as long as the list of artists, but I am not convinced that unhappiness, depression, addiction and suicide are a requirement for creativity or the creation of great art.  I think creativity can come equally from love, joy, sanity and modesty.   But for some,  the lighter side of the human experience is not nearly as productive personally.  As a rule I know  the art I am most attracted imparts an emotion or an idea regardless of whether it is positive or negative.

I think there is a certain lurid fascination with the artist who becomes a Phoenix, bursting into flame mid-flight.  Those artists who share their doomed voyage either in spite of their art or who choose to use their art as a legacy of their descent.  My preference however, is for artists, who singe their wings but do not implode or explode and manage to land safely enough to preserver.

Circling back one last time, for now, to Wilco, I found this short interview with Jeff Tweedy talking about the idea of a tortured artist and his own struggles.  In the end, I think it all depends, like Shakespeare says above, on whether you can separate art from the artist and the idea; “Him have I lost, thou hast both him and me.”

 

Slyvia Plath usually makes the short list in any discussion of tortured artists.  I have found it interesting how my respect for Sylvia Plath’s writing has grown as I have spent more time writing poetry.  But I also have a healthy aversion to her work, reading her in small doses and infrequently.

I don’t agree with Sylvia’s last couplet in her sonnet below.  I am often attracted to poems where my level of disagreement is strong, when the poem sets off an internal debate.  I think of time as a continuous piece of paper before us and a millions words trailing behind.

How do you intrepet Sylvia Plath’s sonnet below?

Sonnet: To Time

By Sylvia Plath

Today we move in jade and cease with garnet
Amid the ticking jeweled clocks that mark
Our years. Death comes in a casual steel car, yet
We vaunt our days in neon and scorn the dark.

But outside the diabolic steel of this
Most plastic-windowed city, I can hear
The lone wind raving in the gutter, his
Voice crying exclusion in my ear.

So cry for the pagan girl left picking olives
Beside a sunblue sea, and mourn the flagon
Raised to toast a thousand kings, for all gives
Sorrow; weep for the legendary dragon.

Time is a great machine of iron bars
That drains eternally the milk of stars.