The Parable of Snow

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The Parable of Snow

by Doug Ramspeck

The mean boys believe in an augury of falling snow,
how it drifts from the shadows of the sky,
burying the land. And what they feel for the ones
they brutalize is a kind of plaintive sorrow,
the way a stream accepts the ice of its own body.
Once I saw one sucking a bloodied knuckle like a succulent
morsel of fruit, saw him leaning against the chain-link
fence and closing his eyes into what appeared, in that instant,
like the suturing of two incisions. The mean boys
are as lonely as a breath struggling to form a cloud
that will not hold, as lonely as the hoof prints of the horses
past my father’s barn, where he walks this morning
like the mean boy he surely was when he was young. 

 

Copyright 2018 University of Tampa Press.  Project Muse.

 


 

Am I alone in finding that poems often take up residence in my mind, whether for a short time or a long time, because of one word?  In the case of Doug Ramspeck’s poem The Parable of Snow, the word for me was – augury.   A word that we have let lapse from our common vocabulary as society has become more secular and we have allowed technology to replace nature as the primary source of wonder in our eyes.

The Parable of Snow is not a sonnet. I am realizing this blog is going to wear me out if I don’t loosen up the reigns a bit and follow the trail of curiosity that brought me to this trail head in the first place. The writing of this blog has taken a toll on my own writing.  I will eventually need to take a break from it if I am to find the energy to write my own poetry with any frequency again.  For now, there is something almost spiritual about pursuing sonnets deeply, beyond the first layer, beyond the second layer, getting to down to the bones and tendons of an idea and letting it ruminate for longer than is possibly even healthy.  It is like I am pursing a master’s degree in literature on-line of my own volition and without the rules and structure of graduate school. This freedom is both more liberal and more restrictive as the bonds of responsibility to the task are all of my own creation.  Isn’t that what all obsessions have in common in the end, a fascination that borders on malignancy?

The process of uncovering sonnets that are candidates for the blog, can at times feel like an excursion into ancient history, an endless campaign of reaching back in time.  It can be a pleasant distraction, but it has also begun to feel after only 6 months like I am intentionally disconnecting from the present.  It’s why I am feeling the need to start to broaden the inclusion of poems that may not meet the rhyming requirements of a strict definition of a sonnet or maybe not even the structure of a sonnet, but are poems that feel relevant in some way to my current thoughts and daily sojourns and forays.

I do not want to taint the artistry of Ramspeck’s poem by attaching to it any specific headline.  Any one can pick up any newspaper and find the ravaging’s of mean boys in print.  I don’t believe that brutality is genetic. I don’t believe it is a natural manifestation of mental illness, poverty, drug use or depression.  There are plenty of people whose response to adversity or even cruelty is to become gentler and more introspective.   How do “mean boys” become mean?   Why do we elect or promote “mean boys” into positions of power in business and government?  What does our current governments say about the electorate at large, not only here in the United States but around the world? Are despots the manifestation of their own identity or a reflection of the society that allowed them the power to become a despot in the first place?  Are democratic despots, our current despot in chief a prime example, more corrupt than some local strongman turned marauder, as they are the very epitome of corruptness of the entire political machinery that allowed them to ascend to the very height of government? Our current President is the biggest bully on the block, twitter his megaphone, hammer and anvil.  His critics and defenders are both quick to rise to the challenge of bullying right back to prove the correctness of their position, all sides forgetting that the softness voice in the room often carries the argument upon reflection.

If meanness is a learned behavior, can it be unlearned? These are the questions I ask myself in the aftermath of another mass shooting another lurid headline of unreasonableness.  If the answer is that violence and war are part of our nature and guns an unassailable reality of American culture, then their is no solution to this problem, other than to hope that those of us that choose to live our lives without weapons evade the randomness of what the mean boys have in store to keep themselves entertained or to write their final epitaph in blood.

What Have You In Your Heart

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A Shropshire Lad: XXXII

By A. E. Housman

From far, from eve and morning
And yon twelve-winded sky,
The stuff of life to knit me
Blew hither: here am I.

Now—for a breath I tarry
Nor yet disperse apart—
Take my hand quick and tell me
What have you in your heart.

Speak now, and I will answer;
How shall I help you, say;
Ere to the wind’s twelve quarters
I take my endless way.


 

Whew! It’s March and a burst of spring sunshine today betrayed the nearly foot of fresh snow of the past week, melting it rapidly.  March is the month of muddy foot prints on kitchen floors in Minnesota. The earth comes out of its frozen slumber wet and slimy, attaching itself to everything with which it comes into contact,  reminding us that the ubiquitous stubbornness of clay and organic matter is the very stuff from which new life springs. The beauty of spring flowers doesn’t come from April showers, it comes from the black muck that holds the nutrients that feed beauty.

It’s time to move on into more playful fare in this blog. I used the month of February to stray into history and politics, probably wearing everyone out,  temporarily avoiding the true reason for starting this blog; the exploration of poetry as a mirror by which love is reflected.  Love is a complicated thing.  I’m lucky.  I have had good role models for love my entire life, by those around me and those that have been gracious enough to love me.  I hope love continues to teach this old dog a few more new tricks.

 

Those Who Know

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Marcus Garvey

 

I am not proud that I am bold
Or proud that I am black.
Color was given me as a gauge
And boldness came with that.

Helene Johnson

The Tired Worker

By Claude McKay

O whisper, O my soul! The afternoon
Is waning into evening, whisper soft!
Peace, O my rebel heart! for soon the moon
From out its misty veil will swing aloft!
Be patient, weary body, soon the night
Will wrap thee gently in her sable sheet,
And with a leaden sigh thou wilt invite
To rest thy tired hands and aching feet.
The wretched day was theirs, the night is mine;
Come tender sleep, and fold me to thy breast.
But what steals out the gray clouds like red wine?
O dawn! O dreaded dawn! O let me rest
Weary my veins, my brain, my life! Have pity!
No! Once again the harsh, the ugly city.


 

Those Who Know

by Marcus Garvey

You may not know, and that is all
That causes you to fail in life;
All men should know, and thus not fall
The victims of the heartless strife.
Know what? Know what is right and wrong,
Know just the things that daily count,
That go to make all life a song,
And cause the wise to climb the mount.

To make man know, is task, indeed,
For some are prone to waste all time:
It’s only few who see the need
To probe and probe, then climb and climb,
The midnight light, the daily grind,
Are tasks that count for real success
In life of those not left behind,
Whom Nature chooses then to bless.

The failing men you meet each day,
Who curse their fate, and damn the rest,
Are just the sleeping ones who play
While others work to reach the best.
All life must be a useful plan,
That calls for daily, serious work-
The work that wrings the best from man-
The work that cowards often shirk.

All honour to the men who know,
By seeking after Nature’s truths:
In wisdom they shall ever grow,
While others hum the awful “blues”
Go now and search for what there is-
The knowledge of the Universe-
Make it yours, as the other, his,
And be as good, but not the worse.

Égalité for All

 

 

To Toussaint L’Ouverture

by William Wordsworth

Toussaint, the most unhappy Man of Men!
Whether the rural Milk-maid by her Cow
Sing in thy hearing, or thou liest now
Alone in some deep dungeon’s earless den,
O miserable Chieftain! where and when
Wilt thou find patience? Yet die not; do thou
Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow:
Though fallen Thyself, never to rise again,
Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind
Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies;
There’s not a breathing of the common wind
That will forget thee; thou hast great allies;
Thy friends are exultations, agonies,
And love, and Man’s unconquerable mind.


 

I am currently reading Colson Whitehead’s novel The Underground Railway.  It is a moving fictional account of what the human spirit will endure to achieve freedom.  Whitehead is a brilliant writer; his poetic prose, steeps you in the moral corruption of the South, the barbaric cruelty that powered the wealth that came from indigo, cotton and sugar production.  It is a legacy of the ruthlessness of fellow human beings that casts a shadow all the way to today over the United States.  How do we address the history of atrocities that paved the way for the economic foundation that allowed for the United States to become the world’s wealthiest country? I tire of the willful ignorance, the pretension that American prosperity was built solely upon ingenuity and self determination, without acknowledging that prosperity also came with a legacy of genocide and the immorality of slavery that still bears a responsibility of recognition and forgiveness.

Touissant L’Ouverture is not a historical figure with whom many in the United States are familiar. Touuissant was one of the leaders of a rebellion that parallels our own revolution, when the slaves of then Hispaniola and Saint-Dominique, modern day Haiti, and the Dominican Republic, fought back and won their freedom. The ideas of independence which spawned the French Revolution and the Declaration of Rights of Man in 1789, made the hypocrisy of slavery in French colonies unsustainable and its overthrow inevitable. The idea that all men had unassailable rights that extended beyond skin color was an idea that threw gasoline on what was already an inferno of madness in slavery.  Although Haiti is an impoverished nation today, it as a direct result of a conspiracy of economic retribution by Europe and the United States, a continuation of the tyranny, that was overcome. Haiti (Saint-Dominique) was the richest of all European colonies 250 years ago, with over sixty percent of the coffee imported and forty percent of the sugar consumed in Europe produced there. This immense wealth only made possible by the  cruelty of slave labor.

L’Ouverture was a talented provocateur, orator and military general, who would defeat the armies of France, Great Britain and the United States successfully over a 12 year period, with military casualties in excess of 50,000 men combined from those three nations, before being betrayed by his own lieutenants who thirsted for greater power themselves after the imperialist landowners were overthrown. L’Ouverture was captured, chained and returned to France, tried in court and sentenced to a remote prison to die, not realizing for himself the very freedom he had helped win for an entire nation.

For more information on Touissant L’Ouverture see the link for a documentary below.

The two sonnets I have included span a period of 200 years in their creation.   Each poet, inspired by L’Ouverture’s life.  Wordsworth, although not an abolitionist,  recognized the  courage and moral right of L’Ouverture and Agard, who envisioned a response that is neither rebuttal, nor concurrence with Wordsworth, but a tribute to the humanity of both of men.

How come I didn’t learn about the history of Haiti in high school, when it’s very history is borne of the same noble ideas of equality for all that is the foundation of the American revolution? Is it because we still bear responsibility for a collective failure to reconcile both the heroic and monstrous aspects of United States history.

 


Toussaint L’Ouverture acknowledges Wordsworth’s sonnet “To Toussaint L’Ouverture”

(2006)
John Agard

I have never walked on Westminster Bridge
or had a close-up view of daffodils.
My childhood’s roots are the Haitian hills
where runaway slaves made a freedom pledge
and scarlet poincianas flaunt their scent.
I have never walked on Westminster Bridge
or speak, like you, with Cumbrian accent.
My tongue bridges Europe to Dahomey.
Yet how sweet is the smell of liberty
when human beings share a common garment.
So, thanks brother, for your sonnet’s tribute.
May it resound when the Thames’ text stays mute.
And what better ground than a city’s bridge
for my unchained ghost to trumpet love’s decree.

 

Poem © John Agard, Alternative Anthem: Selected Poems with Live DVD (Bloodaxe Books, 2009)

Love’s Austere and Lonely Offices

Robert Hayden
Robert Hayden (1913 – 1980)

Frederick Douglass

by Robert Hayden

When it is finally ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful
and terrible thing, needful to man as air,
usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all,
when it is truly instinct, brain matter, diastole, systole,
reflex action; when it is finally won; when it is more
than the gaudy mumbo jumbo of politicians:
this man, this Douglass, this former slave, this Negro
beaten to his knees, exiled, visioning a world
where none is lonely, none hunted, alien,
this man, superb in love and logic, this man
shall be remembered. Oh, not with statues’ rhetoric,
not with legends and poems and wreaths of bronze alone,
but with the lives grown out of his life, the lives
fleshing his dream of the beautiful, needful thing.


Those Winter Sundays

by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached
from labor in the weekday weather made
banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.

I’d wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he’d call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.
What did I know, what did I know
of love’s austere and lonely offices?

Robert Hayden, “Those Winter Sundays”  and “Frederick Douglass” from Collected Poems of Robert Hayden, edited by Frederick Glaysher. Copyright ©1966 by Robert Hayden.

To hear Robert Hayden read his poem, Those Winter Sundays, click on the link below and then click on the red arrow behind the title.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46461/those-winter-sundays

 

 

Laughter Arrogant and Bold

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Helene Johnson (1906 – 1995)

To climb a hill that hungers for the sky,
To dig my hands wrist deep in pregnant earth,
To watch a young bird, veering, learn to fly,
To give a still, stark poem shining birth….

Helene Johnson (Excerpt from Fulfillment)

 

Sonnet To A Negro In Harlem

by Helene Johnson

You are disdainful and magnificant–
Your perfect body and your pompous gait,
Your dark eyes flashing solemnly with hate,
Small wonder that you are incompetent
To imitate those whom you so despise–
Your sholders towering high above the throng,
Your head thrown back in rich, barbaric song,
Palm trees and mangoes stretched before your eyes.
Let others toil and sweat for labor’s sake
And wring from grasping hands their meed of gold.
Why urge ahead your supercilious feet?
Scorn will efface each footprint that you make.
I love your laughter arrogant and bold.
You are too splendid for this city street.

 


 

Poem

By Helene Johnson

Little brown boy,
Slim, dark, big-eyed,
Crooning love songs to your banjo
Down at the Lafayette–
Gee, boy, I love the way you hold your head,
High sort of and a bit to one side,
Like a prince, a jazz prince.   And I love
Your eyes flashing, and your hands,
And your patent-leathered feet,
And your shoulders jerking the jig-wa.
And I love your teeth flashing,
And the way your hair shines in the spotlight
Like it was the real stuff.
Gee, brown boy, I loves you all over.
I’m glad I’m a jig. I’m glad I can
Understand your dancin’ and your
Singin’, and feel all the happiness
And joy and don’t care in you.
Gee, boy, when you sing, I can close my ears
And hear tom-toms just as plain.
Listen to me, will you, what do I know
About tom-toms? But I like the word, sort of,
Don’t you? It belongs to us.
Gee, boy, I love the way you hold your head,
And the way you sing, and dance,
And everything.
Say, I think you’re wonderful.    You’re
Allright with me,
You are.

 

The Human’s Higher Right

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Paul Lawrence Dunbar

If

by Paul Lawrence Dunbar (1872 – 1906)

If life were but a dream, my Love,
And death the waking time;
If day had not a beam, my Love,
And night had not a rhyme,—

A barren, barren world were this

Without one saving gleam;
I ‘d only ask that with a kiss
You ‘d wake me from the dream.
If dreaming were the sum of days,
And loving were the bane;
If battling for a wreath of bays
Could soothe a heart in pain,—

I ‘d scorn the meed of battle’s might,
All other aims above
I ‘d choose the human’s higher right,
To suffer and to love!


Slow Through The Dark

By Paul Lawrence Dunbar

Slow moves the pageant of a climbing race;
Their footsteps drag far, far below the height,
And, unprevailing by their utmost might,
Seem faltering downward from each hard won place.
No strange, swift-sprung exception we; we trace
A devious way thro’ dim, uncertain light,–
Our hope, through the long vistaed years, a sight
Of that our Captain’s soul sees face to face.
Who, faithless, faltering that the road is steep,
Now raiseth up his drear insistent cry?
Who stoppeth here to spend a while in sleep
Or curseth that the storm obscures the sky?
Heed not the darkness round you, dull and deep;
The clouds grow thickest when the summit’s nigh.