Win Thy Happier Fate

Bronte Sisters
Bronte sisters: Anne, Emily and Charlotte (left to right)

“Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.”

Charlotte Bronte (1816 – 1855)

Sleep Brings No Joy To Me

by Emily Bronte (1818 – 1848)

Sleep brings no joy to me,
Remembrance never dies;
My soul is given to misery
And lives in sighs.

Sleep brings no rest to me;
The shadows of the dead
My waking eyes may never see
Surround my bed.

Sleep brings no hope to me;
In sounder sleep they come.
And with their doleful imagery
Deepen the gloom

Sleep brings no strength to me,
No power renewed to brave:
I only sail a wilder sea,
A darker wave.

Sleep brings no friend to me
To soothe and aid to bear;
They all gaze, oh, how scornfully,
And I despair.

Sleep brings no wish to knit
My harassed heart beneath:
My only wish is to forget
In the sleep of death.

 


 

Peace

by John Keats (1795 – 1821)

O PEACE! and dost thou with thy presence bless
The dwellings of this war-surrounded Isle;
Soothing with placid brow our late distress,
Making the triple kingdom brightly smile?
Joyful I hail thy presence; and I hail
The sweet companions that await on thee;
Complete my joy let not my first wish fail,
Let the sweet mountain nymph thy favourite be,
With England’s happiness proclaim Europa’s Liberty.
O Europe! let not sceptred tyrants see
That thou must shelter in thy former state;
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free;
Give thy kings law leave not uncurbed the great ;
So with the horrors past thou’lt win thy happier fate!

One I Would Have Died To Save

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On The Death of Anne Bronte

by Emily Bronte

There’s little joy in life for me,
      And little terror in the grave;
I ‘ve lived the parting hour to see

  .    .Of one I would have died to save

Calmly to watch the failing breath,
.   .Wishing each sigh might be the last;
Longing to see the shade of death
  .   .O’er those belovèd features cast.

The cloud, the stillness that must part
      The darling of my life from me;
And then to thank God from my heart,

  .   .To thank Him well and fervently;

Although I knew that we had lost
.  .The hope and glory of our life;
And now, benighted, tempest-tossed,
.   .Must bear alone the weary strife.

 

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To My Sister
(Excerpt)

by William Wordsworth

One moment now may give us more
Than years of toiling reason:
Our minds shall drink at every pore
The spirit of the season.

Some silent laws our hearts will make,
Which they shall long obey:
We for the year to come may take
Our temper from to-day.

And from the blessed power that rolls
About, below, above,
We’ll frame the measure of our souls:
They shall be tuned to love.

Then come, my Sister! come, I pray,
With speed put on your woodland dress;
And bring no book: for this one day
We’ll give to idleness.