Borderless And Open The Days Go On

Ivor Gurney (1890 – 1937)

with his words
in my head
I slept for thirty
or forty forevers
while the grass shrieked
and the trees tremored…

Deborah Landau

September

By Deborah Landau 
 
Dazzling emptiness of the black green end of summer no one
running in the yard pulse pulse the absence.
 
Leave them not to the empty yards.
 
They resembled a family. Long quiet hours. Sometimes
one was angry sometimes someone called her “wife”
someone’s hair receding.
 
An uptick in the hormone canopy embodied a restlessness
and oh what to do with it.
 
(How she arrived in a hush in a looking away and not looking.)
 
It had been some time since richness intangible
and then they made a whole coat of it.
 
Meanwhile August moved toward its impervious finale.
A mood by the river. Gone. One lucid rush carrying them along.
 
Borderless and open the days go on—
 

A friend of Ivor Gurney’s described him as being “so sane in his insanity.”  Gurney spent the last 15 years of his life in psychiatric hospitals in England, believing himself to actually be Shakespeare for a portion of that time.   A self described composer more than poet or playwright, he wrote more than 300 songs in his lifetime.  Only a small fraction of his music has been performed or recorded.
 
Born in the city of Gloucester in 1890, Gurney was fascinated by music. As a boy he studied under the organist, Dr Herbert Brewer at the Gloucester Cathedral.  Following his service in WWI, he was awarded a scholarship to the Royal College of Music to study composition with Sir Charles Stanford.  But life’s challenges intervened and a nervous breakdown interrupted his studies.
 
However Gurney is an inspiration of resilience. Despite worsening mental and physical health in his early 30’s, the early years of his commitment were productive creatively.  Its unclear how much of his mental illness was attributable to PTSD from the war or the physical impact of being gassed in the trenches but his mental health deteriorated over time until he was unable to continue as an artist the final few years of his life.  His cause of death was tuberculosis, which was rampant in the locked wards of mental institutions of the time.
 
I find it interesting to pair modern poets with counterparts from a 100 years ago.  Some similar ideas run through these two poems around the impermanence of permanence and how the external world moves on without us, regardless of the machinations of our inner life. 
 
 

Sonnet – September 1922

by Ivor Gurney

Fierce indignation is best understood by those
Who have time or no fear, or a hope in its real good.
One loses it with a filed soul or in sentimental mood.
Anger is gone with sunset, or flows as flows
The water in easy mill-runs; the earth that ploughs
Forgets protestation in its turning, the rood
Prepares, considers, fulfils; and the poppy’s blood
Makes old the old changing of the headland’s brows.

But the toad under the harrow toadiness
Is known to forget, and even the butterfly
Has doubts of wisdom when that clanking thing goes by
And’s not distressed. A twisted thing keeps still –
That thing easier twisted than a grocer’s bill –
And no history of November keeps the guy.

Published by

A Sonnet Obsession

I am a life-long Minnesotan who resides in Minneapolis. I hope you enjoy my curated selection of sonnets, short poems and nerdy ruminations. I am pleased to offer Fourteenlines as an ad and cookie free poetry resource, to allow the poetry to be presented on its own without distractions. Fourteenlines is a testament to the power of the written word, for anyone wanting a little more poetry in their life.

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