Being Rich In Will Add To Thy Will

NYE
Ring Out The Old, Ring In The Ne

 

Do you make New Year’s resolutions?   Are they motivations for change?  Are they wishes unlikely to be kept? Does it matter whether we keep them or not if they signal an awareness for the possibility of change? Ben Franklin said of New Year’s; “Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every New Year find you a better man (or woman).” Ben, that sounds like you are taking all the fun out of NYE celebrations.  Let’s make that our goal on January 2 and dabble in vice for a couple more days.

I always have one or two New Year’s resolutions. They are usually modest nudges towards change of something that I know that I can achieve, something I am already trending towards but want to strengthen my commitment. I don’t set resolutions with expectations of something unrealistic.  I purposefully dream small on New Year’s eve, the New Year still a shimmer of possibility, the past year something more substantial of accomplishments to be savored and celebrated.

William Shakespeare’s sense of humor is in full display in the sonnet below. Is the capitalized “Will” referring only to himself, or the greater mass of our collective wills? The word “will” is included twelve times in fourteen lines, making it the most willful sonnet I have ever come across, but as he says; “The sea, all water, yet receives rain still.”  One simply can’t have too much will or William.  Enjoy.


 

Sonnet 135

by William Shakespeare

Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will,
And Will to boot, and Will in overplus;
More than enough am I that vex thee still,
To thy sweet will making addition thus.
Wilt thou, whose will is large and spacious,
Not once vouchsafe to hide my will in thine?
Shall will in others seem right gracious,
And in my will no fair acceptance shine?
The sea, all water, yet receives rain still,
And in abundance addeth to his store;
So thou being rich in Will add to thy Will
One will of mine, to make thy large Will more.
   Let no unkind, no fair beseechers kill;
   Think all but one, and me in that one Will

Published by

A Sonnet Obsession

I am a life-long Minnesotan who resides in Minneapolis. I hope you enjoy my curated selection of sonnets, short poems and nerdy ruminations.

2 thoughts on “Being Rich In Will Add To Thy Will”

  1. Feeling silly this morning. Here’s my remake with my name sake…the word fry having so many meanings.

    Sonnet 135
    by T. A. Fry

    Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Fry,
    And Fry to boot, and fry in overplus;
    More than enough am I that vex thee still,
    To thy sweet fry making addition thus.
    Wilt thou, whose fry is large and spacious,
    Not once vouchsafe to hide my fry in thine?
    Shall fry in others seem right gracious,
    And in my fry no fair acceptance shine?
    The pan, all oil, yet receives fat still,
    And in abundance addeth to his store;
    So thou being rich in Fry add to thy Fry
    One fry of mine, to make thy large Fry more.
    Let no unkind, no fair maidens ask why;
    Think all but one, and me in that one Fry

    Like

  2. Or this one…

    Sonnet 135
    by T. A. Fry

    Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Mary,
    And Merry to boot, and Mary in overplus;
    More than enough am I that vex thee still,
    To thy sweet merry making addition thus.
    Wilt thou, whose Marry is large and spacious,
    Not once vouchsafe to hide my Mary in thine?
    Shall Mary in others seem right gracious,
    And in my Mary no fair acceptance shine?
    The school, all full, yet receives students still,
    And in abundance addeth to her store;
    So thou being rich in Merry add to thy Mary
    One Mary of mine, to make thy large Merry more.
    Let no unkind, no fair beseechers be wary;
    Think all but one, and me in that one Mary.

    Like

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